New Patented Technology For Eye Disease Treatment Booms in European Market

The concept of patenting a project or idea is meant to provide protection for your idea under the law, according to uspto.gov. According to the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), there are over 6.1 million patents in the United States such as LED lighting, purification, fertilizer coating, and many more. However, restaurant server Christian Cruz believed that patenting your project doesn’t always provide all of the protection and peace of mind that one might expect.

“Your patented protect is safe to a certain extent. Your original ideas stay safe,” Cruz explained, “but there will always be someone trying to copy your product. When they do, you should immediately try and stop them from making the same thing.”

This picture of the GoPro Hero 3 is an example of a patented product where others cannot comply the replica. As seen here.
This picture of the GoPro Hero 3 is an example of a patented product where others cannot comply the replica. As seen here.

A recent news article introduced a new technology and class of eye disease drugs that now exists throughout the upper end of the European market. According to Eye Co, this newly patented technology to treat eye disease differs from others in the way the steroid medicine is created and administered. Several different therapies seen in the news had caused some serious side effects, however this new technology that is now patented creates an improved response from past trials, according to Eye Co chief scientist Philip Penfold.

An example of the Shoei brand, a famous motocycle riding company, currently patented for their products, as seen here.
An example of the Shoei brand, a famous motocycle riding company, currently patented for their products, as seen here.

Accordingly, Cruz viewed the patenting process as a business and doesn’t rely on patents as a decision-making factor towards medication or medical procedure choices.

“I would never use a drug that wasn’t patented because I wouldn’t know what it does. It depends on the drug’s purpose. A lot of drugs are patented; some are good for you and some aren’t. A drug that is patented,” he continued, “versus a drug that isn’t has only one difference: money. If it’s patent, whoever did it gets to make the money. That’s all it’s about.”

Finally, Cruz shared that he would rather rely on word of mouth from people he trusts, rather than the latest patent news.

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An example of the Studio HD headphone technology, which is a patented product as seen here.

“If the doctors refer me to a medicine, I trust it. The patent doesn’t make me want to buy the product more or less. It just depends on physicians review, advice, and basically how well the product works.”

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