Media Uses FOIA Law to Sue Attorney General For Prescription Drug Case

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) is a law that provides each state with regulations pertaining to what records individuals are allowed access. If someone would like access to records in the state of California, they must provide an effective statement as to why they want the records, as well as identify the record requested, and fight through potential barriers that come up during their search.

Cabinets containing restricted information that are only accessible to certain parties, as seen here. Photo taken by Leilani Photography.
Cabinets containing restricted information that are only accessible to certain parties, as seen here. Photo taken by Leilani Photography.

Spencer Juarez is entrepreneur and healthcare professional that would utilize FOIA to establish his business and then to protect it when it came to consumers using his recently designed phone application. 

I would use FOIA for screening purposes pertaining to my business. I want to know anything and everything about health history and jobs of my potential employees. For example, I could use FOIA to implement an application for a credit card relating to identification, as well as and for validity in records. It’s very necessary to know the full picture.”

In addition, Juarez believes the recent case against the Charleston Gazette suing Patrick Morrisey should be thrown out.

A recent article by Eric Eyre states that the Charleston Gazette is suing the West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey pertaining to his involvement in Cardinal Health’s drug related distribution case. The lawsuit is stating that Cardinal Health contributed to Southern West Virginia’s prescription’s drug abuse by sending out large amounts of prescription drugs to that area. Interest was sparked because Morrisey’s wife is the lobbyist for this particular drug company, and Morrisey inherited the case after the last Attorney General was ejected. The Charleston Gazette applied the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) law to sue for these records, under which they were granted eight related documents. However, Morrisey is denying the release of any additional records, claiming that he has attorney-client privileges that cannot be violated.

A large quantity of prescription pills, as seen here. Photo taken by Leilani Photography.
A large quantity of prescription pills, as seen here. Photo taken by Leilani Photography.

Juarez thinks this case violates the laws that go along with marriage rights.

“I think everyone has a right to privacy. First”, he says, “Lobbyist are really crooked, and are just trying to make an extra buck. These people make a lot of money. If I were Morrisey, I would pass the case on as fast as possible. The case won’t go anywhere and it will get thrown out based upon the vows they made in their common law marriage. They’re allowed to lie under oath. You don’t have to plea against your spouse, which is a law as well.”

In addition, Juarez feels that FOIA laws should be more specific when it comes to healthcare related issues, such as the recent Ebola outbreak.

“FOIA should only be applied to healthcare issues based on circumstance. If you had Ebola for example,” he says, “you need records for that information; it is detrimental and extremely important. Minor records don’t require the same amount of information, therefore, that many records do not need to be released.”

A simulation of where highly classified files would be kept in court, as seen here. Photo by Leilani Photography.
A simulation of where highly classified files would be kept in court, as seen here. Photo by Leilani Photography.

 

 

Post a comment

You may use the following HTML:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>